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CTSinterchange

CTS Interchange

The CTS Interchange serves as a repository for educational and training materials relevant to clinical and translational sciences.  Search resources, presentations, lectures, papers and more at your convenience. Resources are available for the following categories: research project design and development, research mentoring, regulatory science, bioinformatics, community engagement, team science and entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

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Category Title Type Link Pub. Date Abstract
team science Do Workgroup Faultlines Help or Hurt? A Moderated Model of Faultlines, Team Identification, and Group Performance Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Bezrukova-et-al.-2009-OS.pdf In this study we examine a moderated model of group faultlines, team identification, and group performance outcomes. We extend research on faultlines by showing how different faultline bases (social category and information-based faultlines) may have differential effects on the performance of groups. In addition to faultline strength (the extent of demographic alignment across members within a group), we examine the distance between faultline-based subgroups (e.g., two members
of age 20 are closer in age to two members of an opposing subgroup of age 25 than of two members of age 50). We test our model using an archival field methodology and multiple-source data (qualitative and quantitative) from 76 workgroups in a Fortune 500 information-processing company. Our results revealed that groups with social category faultlines had low team discretionary awards. Faultline distance further exacerbated the negative effects of strength in groups with social
category faultlines and produced similarly negative effects in groups with information-based faultlines. Team identification served as a moderator enhancing performance of groups with information-based faultlines.
team science Power, Status, and Learning in Organizations Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Bunderson-et-al.-2011-OS.pdf This paper reviews the scholarly literature on the effects of social hierarchy—differences in power and status among organizational actors—on collective learning in organizations and groups. We begin with the observation that theories of organization and group learning have tended to adopt a rational system model, a model that emphasizes goal-directed and cooperative interactions between and among actors who may differ in knowledge and expertise but are undifferentiated with respect to power and status. Our review of the theoretical and empirical literatures on power, status, and learning suggests that social hierarchy can complicate a rational system model of collective learning by disrupting three critical learning-related processes: anchoring on shared goals, risk taking and experimentation, and knowledge sharing. We also find evidence to suggest that the stifling effects of power and status differences on collective learning can be mitigated when advantaged actors are collectively oriented. Indeed, our review suggests that higher-ranking actors who use their power and status in more “socialized” ways can play critical roles in stimulating collective learning behavior. We conclude by articulating several promising directions for future research that were suggested by our review.
team science By Whom and When Is Women’s Expertise Recognized? The Interactive Effects of Gender and Education in Science and Engineering Teams Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Joshi-2014-ASQ.pdf Using a round-robin data set assembled from over 60 teams of more than 500 scientists and engineers across a variety of science and engineering disciplines, as well as longitudinal research productivity data, this study examines differences in how men and women in science and engineering teams evaluate their colleagues’ expertise and how that affects team performance. Because these teams are assembled to enhance innovations, they are most productive if they fully utilize the expertise of all team members. Applying a social relations modeling approach, two studies conducted in multidisciplinary research centers in a large public U.S. university test whether a team’s gender composition predicts how well women’s expertise is used within the team, based on peer evaluations of male and female team members with varying education levels. A third study returns to the same two research centers to examine whether the larger context in which the team operates affects the use of expertise and the team’s productivity. An important finding is that the gender and educational attributes of the person being evaluated are less critical to the recognition of expertise
than the attributes of the person conducting the evaluation and the relationship between these two team members. In addition, context matters: gender integrated teams with a higher proportion of highly educated women are more productive in disciplines with a greater female faculty representation.
team science Speaking Up in the Operating Room: How Team Leaders Promote Learning in Interdisciplinary Action Teams Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Edmondson-2003-JMS.pdf This paper examines learning in interdisciplinary action teams. Research on team effectiveness has focused primarily on single-discipline teams engaged in routine production tasks and, less often, on interdisciplinary teams engaged in discussion and management rather than action. The resulting models do not explain differences in learning in interdisciplinary action teams. Members of these teams must coordinate action in uncertain, fast-paced situations, and the extent to which they are comfortable speaking up with observations, questions, and concerns may critically influence team outcomes. To explore what leaders of action teams do to promote speaking up and other proactive coordination behaviours – as well as how organizational context may affect these team processes and outcomes – I analysed qualitative and quantitative data from 16 operating room teams learning to use a new technology for cardiac surgery. Team leader coaching, ease of speaking up, and
boundary spanning were associated with successful technology implementation. The most effective leaders helped teams learn by communicating a motivating rationale for change and by minimizing concerns about power and status differences to promote speaking up in the service of learning.
team science Factors in team effectiveness: Cognitive and demographic similarities of software development team members Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Kang-et-al.-2006-HR.pdf The benefits of teams and teamwork are popular and propounded in management discourse. The use of this lexicon is based on beliefs in the resultant mutual gains for both organizations and individuals. Yet, are all teams, irrespective of the characteristics of membership composition, the same in terms of such beneficial outcomes? This study investigates the importance of team member characteristics, particularly cognitive and demographic, on team effectiveness and which characteristics matter more in team activities, especially where labour turnover is high, such as in software development. The Shared Mental Model is outlined and used as the representative construct for cognitive similarities; while age, tenure and gender are the demographic aspects used. From the relevant literature we develop a hypothesis and subject it to a range of tests based on empirical fieldwork using software development teams in South Korea. Our analysis shows that team effectiveness is more influenced by cognitive than demographic similarities. The implications and limitations of this work are detailed, with its wider relevance to international management, business and practice and other countries, noted.
Cross-Functional Project Groups in Research and New Product Development: Diversity,Communications, Job Stress, and Outcomes Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Keller-2001-AMJ.pdf A model of cross-functional project groups was developed and hypotheses were tested in a study of 93 research and new product development groups from four companies. The results showed that functional diversity had indirect effects through external communication on one-year-later measures. Technical quality and schedule and bud- get performance improved, but group cohesiveness diminished. Functional diversity also had an indirect effect through job stress on group cohesiveness, which was again reduced. Implications for the development of conceptual models of cross-functional groups and their effective management are
team science Prominent but Less Productive: The Impact of Interdisciplinarity on Scientists’ Research Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Leahey-et-al.-2017-ASQ.pdf Federal agencies and universities in the U.S. promote interdisciplinary research because it presumably spurs transformative, innovative science. Using data on almost 900 research-center–based scientists and their 32,000 published articles, along with a set of unpublished papers, we assess whether such research is indeed beneficial and whether costs accompany the potential benefits. Existing research highlights this tension: whereas the innovation literature suggests that spanning disciplines is beneficial because it allows scientists to see connections across fields, the categories literature suggests that spanning disciplines is penalized because the resulting research may be lower quality or confusing to place. To investigate this, we empirically distinguish production and reception effects and highlight a new production penalty: lower productivity, which may be attributable to cognitive and collaborative challenges associated with interdisciplinary research and/or hurdles in the review process. Using an innovative measure of interdisciplinary research that considers the similarity
of the disciplines spanned, we document both penalties (fewer papers published) and benefits (increased citations) associated with it and show that it is a high-risk, high-reward endeavor, one that partly depends on field-level interdisciplinarity.
team science From Sole Investigator to Team Scientist: Trends in the Practice and Study of Research Collaboration Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Leahey-2016-ARS.pdf This article reviews trends in the practice and study of research collaboration, focusing on journal publications in academic science. I briefly describe the different styles and types of collaboration and then focus on the drivers of the trend toward increased collaboration and on its consequences for both individual researchers and science more generally. Scholarship on collaboration seems partial to delineating its benefits; this review highlights the increasing body of research that focuses instead on the possible costs of collaboration. The synthesis reveals several topics that are ripe for investigation,
including the impact of collaboration on the contributing authors and their work, the use of multiple methods and measures, and research integrity. I applaud a few recent efforts to overcome the perennial file-drawer problem by gaining access to collaborations that do not result in publication and thus are typically removed from public review and the research analyst’s eye.
team science Transcending Knowledge Differences in Cross-Functional Teams Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Majchrzak-et-al.-2011-OS.pdf Knowledge differences impede the work of cross-functional teams by making knowledge integration difficult, especially when the teams are faced with novelty. One approach in the literature for overcoming these difficulties, which we refer to as the traverse approach, is for team members to identify, elaborate, and then explicitly confront the differences and dependencies across the knowledge boundaries. This approach emphasizes deep dialogue and requires significant
resources and time. In an exploratory in-depth longitudinal study of three quite different cross-functional teams, we found that the teams were able to cogenerate a solution without needing to identify, elaborate, and confront differences and dependencies between the specialty areas. Our analysis of the extensive team data collected over time surfaced practices that minimized members’ differences during the problem-solving process. We suggest that these practices helped the team to transcend knowledge differences rather than traverse them. Characteristic of these practices is that they avoided interpersonal conflict, fostered the rapid cocreation of intermediate scaffolds, encouraged continued creative engagement and flexibility to repeatedly modify solution ideas, and fostered personal responsibility for translating personal knowledge to collective knowledge. The contrast between these two approaches to knowledge integration—traverse versus transcend—suggests the need for more nuanced theorizing about the use of boundary objects, the nature of dialogue, and the role of organizational embeddedness in understanding how knowledge differences are integrated.
Understanding the Role of Objects in Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Nicolini-et-al.-2012-OS.pdf In this paper, we make a case for the use of multiple theoretical perspectives—theory on boundary objects, epistemic objects, cultural historical activity theory, and objects as infrastructure—to understand the role of objects in crossdisciplinary collaboration. A pluralist approach highlights that objects perform at least three types of work in this context: they motivate collaboration, they allow participants to work across different types of boundaries, and they constitute the fundamental infrastructure of the activity. Building on the results of an empirical study, we illustrate the insights that each theoretical lens affords into practices of collaboration and develop a novel analytical framework that organizes objects according to the active work they perform. Our framework can help shed new light on the phenomenon, especially with regard to the shifting status of objects and sources of conflict (and change) in collaboration. After discussing these novel insights, we outline directions for future research stemming from a pluralist approach. We conclude by noting the managerial implications of our findings.
Health professionals in multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams: Changing professional practice Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Robinson-et-al.-2005-JIC.pdf The article draws on an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded research project that
aimed to investigate the reality behind the rhetoric of ‘‘joined up thinking’’. The research project was a qualitative, multi-method study involving three phases, including observation and documentary
analysis; interviews; and focus groups around decision making and knowledge sharing. The article
reflects on the perspectives and experiences of health professionals and their colleagues in multi-agency teams about the impact of multi-agency teamwork on their professional knowledge and learning, and on their ways of working. Actual and potential conflicts between professionals are explored about models of understanding, about roles, identities, status and power, about information sharing, and around links with other agencies. Dilemmas of team building and of conflicting values and knowledge are exemplified from health professionals’ accounts, using theoretical models of ‘‘communities of practice’’ and ‘‘activity theory’’. The article presents groups of strategies that health professionals and their colleagues in multi-agency, multi-professional teams use to overcome barriers and to strengthen team cohesion. The conclusion reflects on some implications of our findings in theory and practice for professionalism within integrated, multi-professional teams that are building new ways of working.
Facilitating Innovation in Diverse Science Teams Through Integrative Capacity Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Salazar-et-al.-2012-SGR.pdf Knowledge integration in diverse teams depends on their integrative capacity—the social and cognitive processes, along with emergent states, that shape a team’s ability to combine diverse knowledge. We argue that integrative capacity represents the potential that a team has to overcome various compositional, team, and contextual barriers to generating integrated and novel knowledge. This article focuses specifically on the unique challenges facing diverse science teams that have the goal of generating novel knowledge at the intersection of disciplinary, practice, and organizational boundaries. The integrative capacity of a science team is argued to help facilitate the social
and cognitive integration processes necessary for effective team processes that enhance the likelihood of innovative team outcomes. Implications of our theoretical framework for practice and research on fostering innovation in diverse science teams are discussed.
team science Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the Performance of Human Groups Publication http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Woolley-et-al.-2010-Science.pdf Psychologists have repeatedly shown that a single statistical factor—often called “general
intelligence”—emerges from the correlations among people’s performance on a wide variety of cognitive tasks. But no one has systematically examined whether a similar kind of “collective intelligence” exists for groups of people. In two studies with 699 people, working in groups of two to five, we find converging evidence of a general collective intelligence factor that explains a group’s performance on a wide variety of tasks. This “c factor” is not strongly correlated with the average or maximum individual intelligence of group members but is correlated with the average social sensitivity of group members, the equality in distribution of conversational turn-taking, and the proportion of females in the group.
Research Methods An Introduction to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy (MOST) Presentation http://live.libraries.psu.edu/Mediasite/Play/2c51a694b3404492b0c8046402ccf34a1d?catalog=8376d4b2-4dd1-457e-a3bf-e4cf9163feda January 10, 2017 Bench to Bedside and Beyond (B3) Lecture with Linda M. Collins, Ph.D., Director, The Methodology Center for a discussion titled "An Introduction to the Multiphase Optimization Strategy?"

The Bench to Bedside and Beyond (B3) Lecture is a series of educational discussions covering a variety of topics on the translational science spectrum. The goal of the series is to provide participants with the information and tools necessary to play a vital role in accelerating discoveries that benefit human health.
Research Ethics Ethics and Translational Research - Friend or Foe? Presentation http://live.libraries.psu.edu/Mediasite/Play/e5566b7e2ea343ff92bb598d728f5d2e1d?catalog=8376d4b2-4dd1-457e-a3bf-e4cf9163feda November 9, 2016 Bench to Bedside and Beyond (B3) Lecture titled "Ethics and Translational Science - Friend or Foe?"

The Bench to Bedside and Beyond (B3) Lecture is a series of educational discussions covering a variety of topics on the translational science spectrum. The goal of the series is to provide participants with the information and tools necessary to play a vital role in accelerating discoveries that benefit human health.
Special Populations Engaging Special Populations in the Research Process Presentation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aWG9VP68YPs&t=1s December 16, 2016 Video from the Translational Topics @ 12 Webinar with Drs. Janice Penrod, Ph.D., Sheridan Miyamoto, Ph.D., Penn State College of Nursing and Keith Aronson, Ph.D., Penn State College of Health and Human Development. Learn more about special populations include military families, rural populations and tips to engage special populations in the research process.
Research Ethics Cases and Concepts in the Ethical Dimensions of Translational Research Presentation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYE_jGaLv28 November 19, 2016 Video from the Translational Topics @ 12 Webinar with Jennifer McCormick, Ph.D., M.P.P., Associate Professor, Humanities, Penn State College of Medicine and Erich Schienke, Ph.D., Lecturer, Penn State College of Earth and Mineral Sciences. Learn concepts and techniques to apply to clinical and translational science research.
Team Science Leading Multidisciplinary Teams Effectively Presentation https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RTyQS0RrCbg&t=1s October 21, 2016 Video from Translational Topics @ 12 Webinar with Aparna Joshi, Ph.D., Arnold Family Professor of Management, Smeal College of Business, Penn State University. Learn practical tips and techniques to lead successful multidisciplinary teams.
Research Project Design and Development Statistical Analysis II Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Chow-Stat2_seminar_2016.pptx November 8, 2016 Presentation from the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Seminar Series.
Team Science Women are great for scientific teams, but are teams great for women? Presentation http://live.libraries.psu.edu/Mediasite/Play/af1f2cf9d5f2453b896fd8ac3cc45dd51d?catalog=8376d4b2-4dd1-457e-a3bf-e4cf9163feda October 11, 2016 Bench to Bedside and Beyond (B3) Lecture with Aparna Joshi, Ph.D., Arnold Family Professor of Management, Smeal College of Business for a discussion titled "Women are Great for Scientific Teams, but are Teams Great for Women?"

The Bench to Bedside and Beyond (B3) Lecture is a series of educational discussions covering a variety of topics on the translational science spectrum. The goal of the series is to provide participants with the information and tools necessary to play a vital role in accelerating discoveries that benefit human health.
Research Project Design and Development Epidemiological Methods Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/BERD-Liao-1-cross-sectional-study.ppt September 1, 2016 Presentation on Epidemiological Methods by Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D., for the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Seminar Series, Fall 2016.
Research Project Design and Development Epidemiological Methods Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/BERD-Liao-2-cohort-study.ppt September 8, 2016 Presentation on Epidemiological Methods by Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D. as part of the Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Seminar Series, Fall 2016.
Entrepreneurship & Innovation Small Business Administration SBIR/STTR Resource Video https://www.sbir.gov/tutorials/ These tutorials are designed to help interested parties learn more about the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs.
Research Project Design and Development Clearinghouse for Training Modules to Enhance Data Reproducibility Video https://www.nigms.nih.gov/training/pages/clearinghouse-for-training-modules-to-enhance-data-reproducibility.aspx Series of four training modules developed by NIH focusing on integral aspects of rigor and reproducibility in the research endeavor, such as bias, blinding and exclusion criteria. The modules are not meant to be comprehensive, but rather are intended as a foundation to build on and a way to stimulate conversations, which may be facilitated by the use of the accompanying discussion materials. Currently, the modules are being integrated into NIH intramural training activities.
Entrepreneurship & Innovation Where Science Meets Business: Resources to Accelerate Technology Development Video https://publicmultimedia.hmc.psu.edu/Mediasite/Play/fdc4ae5d96644efb92d540754dac4c431d?catalog=b00c16dd-f65b-4af1-a08b-9b048bbdf007 March 16, 2016 The video is a recording of the Discover - Lunchtime Lecture Series sponsored by the Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute. The program features resources and programs to assist investigators with the technology development process.

Penn State access ID required to view video.
Bioinformatics PCORNet and the PaTH Clinical Data Research Network Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/RQA_PCORNet_PaTH_20160217.pdf February 17, 2016 The presentation is part of the Penn State College of Medicine - Research Quality Assurance Lunchtime Lecture Series featuring Cynthia Chuang, M.D., M.Sc., Division of General Internal Medicine, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center.

Team Science Health and the Environment - Interdisciplinary Opportunities Across Penn State Video https://publicmultimedia.hmc.psu.edu/Mediasite/Play/1067cdb8bb174f62bff332a494327fa31d?catalog=b00c16dd-f65b-4af1-a08b-9b048bbdf007 The video is a recording of the Discover - Lunchtime Lecture Series sponsored by the Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute. The program features Penn State Institutes of Energy and the Environment.

Penn State access ID required to view video.
Research Project Design and Development Research Data - Compliance, Ownership and Preservation Presentation https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/files/5712mw40g August 20, 2015 Presentation was part of program titled: Research Data: Compliance, Ownership and Preservation. The program discussed Penn State data policies affecting project design, data ownership and intellectual property, roles of the Institutional Review Board, practical Penn State data programs and infrastructure available.

Penn State access ID required to view presentation.
Research Project Design and Development Data Management Presentation https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/files/5712mw39q August 20, 2015 Presentation was part of program titled: Research Data: Compliance, Ownership and Preservation. The program discussed Penn State data policies affecting project design, data ownership and intellectual property, roles of the Institutional Review Board, practical Penn State data programs and infrastructure available.

Penn State access ID required to view presentation.
Bioinformatics Security and Integrity of Human Research Data Presentation https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/files/5712mw41r August 20, 2015 Presentation was part of program titled: Research Data: Compliance, Ownership and Preservation. The program discussed Penn State data policies affecting project design, data ownership and intellectual property, roles of the Institutional Review Board, practical Penn State data programs and infrastructure available.

Penn State access ID required to view presentation.
Entrepreneurship & Innovation Intellectual Property and Data Management Presentation https://scholarsphere.psu.edu/files/5712mw38f August 20, 2015 Presentation was part of program titled: Research Data: Compliance, Ownership and Preservation. The program discussed Penn State data policies affecting project design, data ownership and intellectual property, roles of the Institutional Review Board, practical Penn State data programs and infrastructure available.

Penn State access ID required to view presentation.
Bioinformatics Spatial Analysis for Population Health Research Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/PSU-CTSI-BERD_Spatial-Analysis-for-Health-Research-20160419.pdf April 19, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring speaker, Quangqing Chi, Ph.D., associate professor, Rural Sociology and Demography, faculty director, Population Research Institute Demographic Methods Core and Social Science Research Institute Geographic Information Analysis Core at Penn State University.
Bioinformatics Face Factors: Data Reduction and Computer Vision for Behavioral Science Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Brick-BERD-Sp2016-Small.pdf April 12, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Tim Brick, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State College of Health and Human Development.
Bioinformatics Incorporating Hierarchical Structure into Dynamic Systems: An Application of Estimating HIV Epidemics at Sub-National and Sub-Population Level Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Bao2016March-BHM.pdf March 29, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Le Bao, Ph.D., Department of Statistics, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development New Approaches to Analyze Intensive Longitudinal Data Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/BERD-2016.pdf March 15, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Peter C.M. Molenaar, Ph.D., Quantitative Development Systems Group, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Time-Varying Effect Modeling to Study Developmental and Dynamic Processes Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Lanza-CTSI-BERD-Feb-2016.pdf February 23, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Stephanie Lanza, Ph.D., professor, Biobehavioral Health, scientific director, The Methodology Center, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Spatial Disease Mapping and Multicollinearity Presentation https://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/April-20-PPT-Hanks.pdf April 20, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Ephraim Hanks, Ph.D., assistant professor, Department of Statistics, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development A Quick Guide to Collection and Analysis of Intensive Longitudinal Data: Modeling of Intraindividual Variability Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/April-13-PPT-Ram.pdf April 13, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Nilam Ram, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Birds of a Feather or Friend of a Friend? Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/March-30-PPT-Hunter1.pdf March 30, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Dave Hunter, Ph.D., professor, Department Chair, Statistics, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Expanding the Toolbox: A New Way to Build More Effective and Efficient Behavioral Interventions Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/March-16-PPT-Kugler.pdf March 16, 2015 The presentation was a part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Kari Kugler, Ph.D., M.P.H., research associate, The Methodology Center, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Statistical Issues Relevant to Failures to Replicate and the Crisis in Science Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Feb-16-PPT-Loken.pdf February 16, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Eric Loken, Ph.D., research associate professor, Department of Health and Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Chinchilli-2016_02_09.pdf February 9, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Vernon Chinchilli, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Put it all together in a research proposal/protocol Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/put-it-together-BERD-seminar.pdf January 26, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D., professor, Vice Chair for Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine.
Bioinformatics Data Management Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/DM_seminar_2016.pdf January 12, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Rosanna Pogash, M.P.A., manager, Public Health Sciences Data Management Unit.
Research Project Design and Development Statistical Analysis - Part II Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Chow_Stat1_seminar-1.pdf December 15, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Mosuk Chow, Ph.D., senior scientists and professor, Department of Statistics, Penn State University.
Research Project Design and Development Statistical Analysis - Part I Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Kong-Stat2_seminar-1.pdf December 8, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Lan Kong, Ph.D., associate professor, Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Power and Sample Size Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Sample-Size-and-Power.pdf November 17, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Allen Kunselman, MA, Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Clinical Trials Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Chinchilli-2015_11_101.pdf November 10, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Vernon Chinchilli, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Matched Case Control Study Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/BERD-Seminar-4-Liao-Matched-case-control-study.pdf October 27, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D., professor and Vice Chair for Research, Department of Public Health Sciences at Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Case Control Study Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/BERD-Seminar-3-Liao-case-control-study.pdf October 13, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D., professor and Vice Chair for Research, Department of Public Health Sciences at Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Cohort Study Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BERD-Seminar-2-Liao-cohort-study.pdf September 22, 2016 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science Institute's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D., professor and Vice Chair for Research, Department of Public Health Sciences at Penn State College of Medicine.
Research Project Design and Development Introduction to Clinical Research Designs and Cross-Sectional Study Presentation http://ctsi.psu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/BERD-Seminar-1-Liao-cross-sectional-study.pdf September 8, 2015 The presentation was part of the Clinical and Translational Science's Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Group Seminar Series featuring presenter, Duanping Liao, M.D., Ph.D., professor and Vice Chair for Research, Department of Public Health Sciences at the Penn State College of Medicine.